As a food loving dietitian, each year I can’t wait to check out the food and flavour predictions. What is the next bold flavour for your recipes? Move over 2013 superfruit (perhaps it’s time to get a new Agent), the buffaloberry is the ‘it’ fruit of 2014. The “eggs are bad” mantra is gone and egg yolks are in, with chefs working their magic to make them exotic! And the trends go on. For this post, I’m excited to share with you my favourite food and flavour trends for 2014.

Fermented Foods , Ginger and Szechuan Pepper

  • In 2013, I blogged about Fermented Foods after meeting and interviewing Sandor Katz at the IACP Conference in San Francisco. As it turns out kimchi, sauerkraut and pickles are showing no signs of slowing down in 2014. Some research confirms fermented foods support a healthy GI ecosystem therefore promoting gut and immune health. A great reason to add fermented foods to your menu!
  • Ginger is predicted to be a popular flavour in 2014, due to the demand for strong flavours, spices and heat (1). In 2013, I included ginger in my Foods for Immune Health blog. It is my favourite flavour to work with in my kitchen. I add it to salad dressings, pork, fish and chicken dishes and to all my stir fries.
  • 2014 is demanding strong flavours and high heat! Hello Szechuan pepper, you’re going to be very popular this year. Known for its bold flavour, it delivers a mouth tingling and numbing sensation plus great citrusy flavours (2). Check out the Szechuan Chicken Wing Recipe at the end of the blog – perfect for the Super Bowl party!

Seaweed and Seeds

  • I first blogged about The Popular Sea Veggie in 2013. According to the Food Channel, seaweed is officially the new super green for 2014. There are many varieties: spindly hijiki, sheets of crispy nori and mild dulse flakes, to name a few. Add this briny sea flavor busting with great nutrition to your menu.
  • I’ve been blogging and writing (Final Proof Columns for Bakers Journal) about seeds since 2011! Chia, Quinoa, Hemp and For the Love of Seeds (flax and pumpkin). Three years later, seeds are showing no signs of taking a back seat. In fact, both chia and hemp are gaining more attention due to their omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids (3).
    • Are you craving more facts, ideas and recipes for seeds? Stay tuned for the launch of my New Book later this year!

Pancakes for Dinner and Exotic Egg Yolks

  • What Canadian doesn’t think of pancakes drenched in pure maple syrup on a cold winter weekend morning! Now think outside that recipe box…Bon Appétit Foodist Crystal Ball predicts savoury pancakes made with sourdough batter and studded with unique ingredients like sea urchin, squid and smoked fish showing up on dinner menus in San Fran and NYC. I’d order them! Would you?
  • Both Bon Appétit and the Cooking Channel forecast the brilliance of the egg yolk for 2014. Finally Medical Docs have stopped the “eggs are bad” mantra. As RDs, we have always known egg yolks deliver the bulk of eggs’ nutritional benefits. They give you lutein and zeaxanthin (both good for eye health), vitamin D and protein. How fun it this? Premiere chefs are experimenting with them…curing and aging the yolks, then grating them on salads and pastas. I want to try!

I hope you enjoyed my favourite food and flavour predictions for 2014. I’m wrapping up with this Beer Braised Szechuan Chicken Wing Recipe from cookingchanneltv.com. It’s perfect to be on trend and share at the Super Bowl party this weekend!

References:

  1. Watson, E. (2013, 8 29). Virginia dare on flavor trends: ‘from candy to beer to tea, everything with ginger is hot right now’. Retrieved from http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Suppliers2/Virginia-Dare-on-flavor-trends-From-candy-to-beer-to-tea-everything-with-ginger-is-hot-right-now
  2. Watson, E. (2013, 8 29). Turning up the heat: Millennials like their flavours hot, spicy and sophisticated says kalsec. Retrieved from http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Markets/Turning-up-the-heat-Millennials-like-their-flavors-hot-spicy-and-sophisticated-says-Kalsec
  3. What are chia seeds? (2013). Retrieved from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442472548